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  • Shan

Plane, Pen to Paper, and Porsche. Oh my!

I'm currently wearing two creative hats.

First, the Writer. I am working on a new article for an art publication. One that deals with the business side of art and protecting ourselves and our creations. I am in the midst of an awful art situation that has guaranteed many restless nights of sleep. As I am a firm believer in learning from bad situations, I am writing an article about what I have experienced plus feedback from professionals that assist small businesses like fine artists.


Art is more than creating and selling. Art is also a business. There is a fine balance between creating, marketing, research, supporting and giving back to the community, nurturing good relations within the industry, and sales. The more recognition your art receives, the more scammers and dishonest folks take notice. These baddies prey on naive artists and their sensitivities. In my 5 years (this month) of being a professional artist, I have run across some of these and want to share ways they can be avoided or dealt with by other artists. I'm interviewing other professional artists, legal, and financial counsel so I have everything accurate. Lots of research ahead.


The other hat I'm wearing is the Artist. I am returning to a Porsche painting that has been sitting in my studio for weeks and weeks. I find this one challenging as it isn't filled with bright colors. Instead, it has a lot of subtle shading to give the illusion of curves. There are reflections in the body, but nothing as pronounced as you'd see in chrome. After this piece, I have a motorcycle, 2 classic cars, and possibly a train to paint. I'm also hunting for a specific classic car from the 1960's for an upcoming exhibition call. *Crossing fingers I find one with time to paint it*.


Lastly, I want to say THANK YOU to the new collector of my 4'x5' 1958 De Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver aircraft painting. I wrote a bit about the story behind the work (see image of it under Portfolio). It is always such a joy to hear that my work connects with my collectors. Artists put a bit of themselves in their work. It is incredibly gratifying when a collector loves my work enough to want it in their environment. That is what makes my job rewarding. :)





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